HandRolledEdges
HandRolledEdges
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aandhmag:

Everyday Elegance by Monsieur Fox
aandhmag:

Everyday Elegance by Monsieur Fox
aandhmag:

Everyday Elegance by Monsieur Fox
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lnsee:

Takahiro Osaki in Fresco Stripes
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lacasuarina:

New York, 1981. 
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theartofanimation:

Goro Fujita
theartofanimation:

Goro Fujita
theartofanimation:

Goro Fujita
theartofanimation:

Goro Fujita
theartofanimation:

Goro Fujita
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artcomesfirst:

With the great Nick Wooster 
ACF Experience @ Liberty Fairs, NY 2014
Photo Kristin Lee Moolman
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artcomesfirst:

ACF Experience @ Liberty Fairs, NY 2014
Photo Kristin Lee Moolman
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yagazieemezi:

Growing up in Nigeria, one of my favorite bi-weekly activities fell on a Saturday when I would trot off and get my hair buzzed for school. I always stuck to one barbershop because you grow to realize that it’s hard to replace the one person you trust with your hair. You become fond of the background noise of laughter and insult, you appreciate the tattered magazines falling off tables, and you are soothed by the humming of the razor against your scalp - Yagazie
Photographer Andrew Esiebo spent three months documenting the barbershops of West Africa, all very much varying in appearance. But regardless of what they look like, be it in Mali or Liberia, barbershops carry a deeper social and cultural meaning other than simply a place you get your hair cut.
Andrew Esiebo started out in photography by chronicling the rapid development of urban Nigeria as well as the country’s rich culture and heritage. As his work began to gain international recognition, Andrew’s started to explore new creative territory, integrating multimedia practice with the investigation of themes such as sexuality, gender politics, football, popular culture and migration. 
Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram
Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic
yagazieemezi:

Growing up in Nigeria, one of my favorite bi-weekly activities fell on a Saturday when I would trot off and get my hair buzzed for school. I always stuck to one barbershop because you grow to realize that it’s hard to replace the one person you trust with your hair. You become fond of the background noise of laughter and insult, you appreciate the tattered magazines falling off tables, and you are soothed by the humming of the razor against your scalp - Yagazie
Photographer Andrew Esiebo spent three months documenting the barbershops of West Africa, all very much varying in appearance. But regardless of what they look like, be it in Mali or Liberia, barbershops carry a deeper social and cultural meaning other than simply a place you get your hair cut.
Andrew Esiebo started out in photography by chronicling the rapid development of urban Nigeria as well as the country’s rich culture and heritage. As his work began to gain international recognition, Andrew’s started to explore new creative territory, integrating multimedia practice with the investigation of themes such as sexuality, gender politics, football, popular culture and migration. 
Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram
Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic
yagazieemezi:

Growing up in Nigeria, one of my favorite bi-weekly activities fell on a Saturday when I would trot off and get my hair buzzed for school. I always stuck to one barbershop because you grow to realize that it’s hard to replace the one person you trust with your hair. You become fond of the background noise of laughter and insult, you appreciate the tattered magazines falling off tables, and you are soothed by the humming of the razor against your scalp - Yagazie
Photographer Andrew Esiebo spent three months documenting the barbershops of West Africa, all very much varying in appearance. But regardless of what they look like, be it in Mali or Liberia, barbershops carry a deeper social and cultural meaning other than simply a place you get your hair cut.
Andrew Esiebo started out in photography by chronicling the rapid development of urban Nigeria as well as the country’s rich culture and heritage. As his work began to gain international recognition, Andrew’s started to explore new creative territory, integrating multimedia practice with the investigation of themes such as sexuality, gender politics, football, popular culture and migration. 
Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram
Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic
yagazieemezi:

Growing up in Nigeria, one of my favorite bi-weekly activities fell on a Saturday when I would trot off and get my hair buzzed for school. I always stuck to one barbershop because you grow to realize that it’s hard to replace the one person you trust with your hair. You become fond of the background noise of laughter and insult, you appreciate the tattered magazines falling off tables, and you are soothed by the humming of the razor against your scalp - Yagazie
Photographer Andrew Esiebo spent three months documenting the barbershops of West Africa, all very much varying in appearance. But regardless of what they look like, be it in Mali or Liberia, barbershops carry a deeper social and cultural meaning other than simply a place you get your hair cut.
Andrew Esiebo started out in photography by chronicling the rapid development of urban Nigeria as well as the country’s rich culture and heritage. As his work began to gain international recognition, Andrew’s started to explore new creative territory, integrating multimedia practice with the investigation of themes such as sexuality, gender politics, football, popular culture and migration. 
Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram
Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic
yagazieemezi:

Growing up in Nigeria, one of my favorite bi-weekly activities fell on a Saturday when I would trot off and get my hair buzzed for school. I always stuck to one barbershop because you grow to realize that it’s hard to replace the one person you trust with your hair. You become fond of the background noise of laughter and insult, you appreciate the tattered magazines falling off tables, and you are soothed by the humming of the razor against your scalp - Yagazie
Photographer Andrew Esiebo spent three months documenting the barbershops of West Africa, all very much varying in appearance. But regardless of what they look like, be it in Mali or Liberia, barbershops carry a deeper social and cultural meaning other than simply a place you get your hair cut.
Andrew Esiebo started out in photography by chronicling the rapid development of urban Nigeria as well as the country’s rich culture and heritage. As his work began to gain international recognition, Andrew’s started to explore new creative territory, integrating multimedia practice with the investigation of themes such as sexuality, gender politics, football, popular culture and migration. 
Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram
Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic
yagazieemezi:

Growing up in Nigeria, one of my favorite bi-weekly activities fell on a Saturday when I would trot off and get my hair buzzed for school. I always stuck to one barbershop because you grow to realize that it’s hard to replace the one person you trust with your hair. You become fond of the background noise of laughter and insult, you appreciate the tattered magazines falling off tables, and you are soothed by the humming of the razor against your scalp - Yagazie
Photographer Andrew Esiebo spent three months documenting the barbershops of West Africa, all very much varying in appearance. But regardless of what they look like, be it in Mali or Liberia, barbershops carry a deeper social and cultural meaning other than simply a place you get your hair cut.
Andrew Esiebo started out in photography by chronicling the rapid development of urban Nigeria as well as the country’s rich culture and heritage. As his work began to gain international recognition, Andrew’s started to explore new creative territory, integrating multimedia practice with the investigation of themes such as sexuality, gender politics, football, popular culture and migration. 
Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram
Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic
yagazieemezi:

Growing up in Nigeria, one of my favorite bi-weekly activities fell on a Saturday when I would trot off and get my hair buzzed for school. I always stuck to one barbershop because you grow to realize that it’s hard to replace the one person you trust with your hair. You become fond of the background noise of laughter and insult, you appreciate the tattered magazines falling off tables, and you are soothed by the humming of the razor against your scalp - Yagazie
Photographer Andrew Esiebo spent three months documenting the barbershops of West Africa, all very much varying in appearance. But regardless of what they look like, be it in Mali or Liberia, barbershops carry a deeper social and cultural meaning other than simply a place you get your hair cut.
Andrew Esiebo started out in photography by chronicling the rapid development of urban Nigeria as well as the country’s rich culture and heritage. As his work began to gain international recognition, Andrew’s started to explore new creative territory, integrating multimedia practice with the investigation of themes such as sexuality, gender politics, football, popular culture and migration. 
Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram
Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic
yagazieemezi:

Growing up in Nigeria, one of my favorite bi-weekly activities fell on a Saturday when I would trot off and get my hair buzzed for school. I always stuck to one barbershop because you grow to realize that it’s hard to replace the one person you trust with your hair. You become fond of the background noise of laughter and insult, you appreciate the tattered magazines falling off tables, and you are soothed by the humming of the razor against your scalp - Yagazie
Photographer Andrew Esiebo spent three months documenting the barbershops of West Africa, all very much varying in appearance. But regardless of what they look like, be it in Mali or Liberia, barbershops carry a deeper social and cultural meaning other than simply a place you get your hair cut.
Andrew Esiebo started out in photography by chronicling the rapid development of urban Nigeria as well as the country’s rich culture and heritage. As his work began to gain international recognition, Andrew’s started to explore new creative territory, integrating multimedia practice with the investigation of themes such as sexuality, gender politics, football, popular culture and migration. 
Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram
Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic
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voxsart:

Brown Is In Town.
Yul Brynner.